Category Archives: Patient advice

How to spot mouth cancer

Beating mouth cancer is so dependent on diagnosing it at an early stage.

If it is caught early, the chances of surviving mouth cancer are nine out of ten – those odds are pretty good, and that’s why early detection is so important.

Sadly, far too many mouth cancers are not spotted early enough.

Mouth Cancer Action Month promotes the message ‘If in doubt, get checked out’. We encourage everybody to be mouthaware and pay more attention to what’s going on inside the mouth. Most importantly, if you notice anything out of the ordinary, it is essential that you tell your dentist or doctor immediately.

Checking for mouth cancer

As mouth cancer can strike in a number of places, including the lips, tongue, gums and cheeks, and given that early detection is so crucial for survival, it’s extremely important that we all know what to look out for.

Three signs and symptoms not to ignore are:

  • Red and white patches in the mouth.
  • Unusual lumps or swellings in the mouth or head and neck area.

When checking for signs of mouth cancer you should follow the following routine:

Head and neck

Check if both sides look the same and search for any lumps, bumps or swellings that are only on one side of the face. Feel and press along the sides and front of your neck being alert to any tenderness or lumps to the touch.

Lips

Pull down your lower lip and look inside for any sores or changes in colour. Use your thumb and forefinger to feel the lip for any unusual lumps, bumps or changes in texture. Repeat this on the upper lip.

Cheek

Use your finger to pull out your cheek so that they can see inside. Look for red, white or dark patches.

Then place your index finger inside your cheek, with your opposing thumb on the outside gently squeeze and roll the cheek to check for any lumps, tenderness or ulcers, repeat this action on the other cheek.

Roof of the mouth

With your head tilted back and mouth open wide, your dentist will look to see if there are any lumps or if there is any change in colour. They will run their finger on the roof of your mouth to feel for any lumps.

Tongue

Examine your tongue, looking at the surface for any changes in colour or texture.

Stick out your tongue or move it from one side to another, again looking for any swelling, change in colour or ulcers. Finally, take a look at the underside of the tongue by placing the tip of your tongue on the roof of your mouth.

Floor of the mouth

Look at the floor of the mouth for changes in colour that are different than normal. Press your finger along the floor of your mouth and underside of your tongue to feel for any unusual lumps, swellings or ulcers.

If you find anything unusual in any of these areas, or are unsure of anything, visit your dentist or doctor as soon as possible.

Mouth aware

How can mouth cancer be detected early?

Mouth cancer can often be spotted in its early stages by your dentist during a thorough mouth examination. This happens during your routine dental check-up.

Start your New Year with a healthier smile

As a New Year begins and we are all looking to live healthier lifestyles, don’t forget how important it is to maintain a healthy mouth.

smile 1

 

3 simple steps to improving your oral health:-

• Visit your dentist for regular check ups

• Brush your teeth for 3 minutes at least twice a day (and remember to floss in between your teeth)

• Cut down your sugar intake especially snacking between meals

If you are unhappy with how your teeth look, now is the time to seek advice from your orthodontist on how we can make your teeth look better.

There are many health benefits to straight teeth and these may include:-

• Simpler brushing: Crooked teeth are harder to clean, allowing food particles to get trapped in the crevices between the teeth. If plaque builds up this can lead to tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath.

• Healthier gums: When teeth are crooked, the gums can become irritated, inflamed and red. These characteristics not only look bad, but also are a warning sign of gum disease.

• Tooth function: Teeth and jaws that are misaligned can cause unequal pressure on some teeth leading to abnormal wear or gum recession.

• Improved speech: Sometimes the simple formation of sounds and the enunciation of words can be a challenge for those with very prominent teeth or with an open bite (i.e. no vertical overlap of the top & bottom teeth). If the teeth are put in a better position this may make it easier to produce the correct sounds correctly.

So, what are you waiting for?

Contact our team of experts today and make 2018 the year you transform your smile!

Contact us: orthostmichaels@tiscali.co.uk or check out our website: https://www.stmichaelsorthodontics.co.uk/ or www.invisiblebraces-yorkshire.co.uk

BE MOUTHAWARE: 45 SECONDS COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

M C

Are you able to recognise the changes in your mouth? That’s the question posed by St Michaels Orthodontics Ltd as they support a charity campaign to raise awareness of mouth cancer.

The orthodontic practice, based Wakefield is urging West Yorkshire residents to be more Mouthaware and recognise the early warning signs of mouth cancer, ahead of November’s Mouth Cancer Action Month.

With awareness of the disease remaining alarmingly low, St Michaels Orthodontcs say that a simple 45 second check is often all that’s needed to identify anything unusual and be able to then seek professional guidance.

  • Early diagnosis transforms our chances of beating mouth cancer from 50 per cent to 90 percent so it is crucial that we know what to look out for and that we do not hesitate in seeking advice from a health professional.
  • A mouth ulcer that does not heal within three weeks, red or white patches in the mouth and unusual lumps or swellings in the mouth or head and neck area, can all be potential signs of mouth cancer so it’s important to be aware of any changes occurring inside your mouth.
  • Quite often it is easier to notice lumps and bumps on the outside of the body or to dismiss a mouth ulcer as benign. Most of us will spend at least a few minutes every day in front of a mirror brushing our teeth so while we’re there it makes sense to have a quick look inside the mouth.
  • If you keep a lookout for these symptoms then a simple 45 second check really could save your life.
  • If you notice anything out of the ordinary, please speak to your dentist or a doctor.

Mouth Cancer Action Month takes place throughout November and is organised by the Oral Health Foundation.

With around 7,000 Brits diagnosed with mouth cancer last year, the disease is one of the UK’s fastest increasing cancers, with cases rising by a third in the last decade alone.

Survival rates of mouth cancer have not improved in the last 20 years and the oral health charity is concerned that too many are mouth cancers are being diagnosed at a late stage, significantly reducing our chance to beat the disease.

CEO of the Oral Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter OBE added: “Mouth cancer can appear anywhere in the mouth including the lips, tongue, cheek, throat and gums.

“Mouth cancer can have a devastating effect on a person’s life, impacting on their breathing, eating and speech. Reconstructive surgery could also change their appearance while the experience often has an impact on confidence and self-esteem.

“By developing a greater understanding about the early warning signs and symptoms, the lifestyle factors which increase our risk, and recognising where to go if we notice anything unusual inside our mouth, we can detect mouth cancer early. This will not only improve our chances of beating it but will also reduce the amount of invasive surgery needed to treat it.

“During every dental check-up, your dentist will do a visual examination for mouth cancer and look for anything that might be a cause for concern. That’s why it’s so important to keep regular dental check-ups – it’s not just about the health of our teeth and gums – a trip to the dentist could really be a life saver.”

To book an appointment with St Michaels Dental Practice please call 01924 383369

To find out more information about mouth cancer and Mouth Cancer Action Month, please visit www.mouthcancer.org

 

 

So your getting braces?

Braces

 

If you’re about to get braces, you’re probably wondering why they’re so important, whether or not they’ll hurt and how long you’ll have to keep them. Get the answers here, plus info on eating with braces and cleaning your braces …

Over 202,300 people in the UK started orthodontic treatment 2014-15!

What are they?

Braces straighten crooked or overcrowded teeth.

There are lots of different types of braces, including see-through ones, white ones, and some that stick to the inside of your teeth.

They exert a steady pressure on the teeth to gradually realign them.

Why have I got to have them?

You’ll get a beautiful smile. Your teeth will be easier to clean (clean teeth = less fillings = less falsies when you’re older).

What will happen at the orthodontist?

The orthodontist is the braces expert. They’ll probably take some X-rays, or some photos of your jaw. You may have to bite down on some mushy stuff or have your teeth scanned to record how your teeth come together.

Once you’re fitted with a brace, you’ll return for check-ups every month or so. The orthodontist may adjust the braces to keep the pressure on your teeth.

Will it hurt?

A little. For a few days after you first get a brace, and for a few days after each adjustment, your mouth may feel a bit sore. But nothing that a pain relief tablet can’t handle. If a wire or bracket is rubbing, smearing on some Vaseline or wax should ease it.

How long will they stay in for?

Fixed braces usually stay in for between eighteen months to two years, but it varies. The longest ever recorded? 20 years. He forgot to go back.

Do I have to stop eating?

No. For a few days after they first go in, you may be advised to stick to soft food. The last thing you want is to dislodge them on a chunk of carrot.

How do I keep them clean?

Braces are like magnets for food. Not only does debris look alarming, but it can also accelerate decay. Clean thoroughly after meals and before bed.

Am I a freak?

No way. Over 202,300 people in the UK started orthodontic treatment in 2014-15 and more adults than ever before are having treatment – often through choice. So just sit tight, safe in the knowledge that you’ll have a killer smile when they come off!

BBC Advice factfiles are here to help young people with a broad range of issues. They’re based on advice from medical professionals, government bodies, charities and other relevant groups. Follow the links for more advice from these organisations.

BBC Advice 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/3ysR0SgtXwfDxJQJ67H8pBZ/braces

BE MOUTHAWARE: 45 SECONDS COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

M C

Are you able to recognise the changes in your mouth? That’s the question posed by St Michaels Orthodontics as they support a charity campaign to raise awareness of mouth cancer.

St Michaels Orthodontics is urging everyone to be more Mouthaware and recognise the early warning signs of mouth cancer, ahead of November’s Mouth Cancer Action Month.

With awareness of the disease remaining alarmingly low, St Michaels Orthodontics say that a simple 45 second check is often all that’s needed to identify anything unusual and be able to then seek professional guidance.

Catherine McCanny from St Michaels Orthodontics says: “Early diagnosis transforms our chances of beating mouth cancer from 50 per cent to 90 percent so it is crucial that we know what to look out for and that we do not hesitate in seeking advice from a health professional.

“A mouth ulcer that does not heal within three weeks, red or white patches in the mouth and unusual lumps or swellings in the mouth or head and neck area, can all be potential signs of mouth cancer so it’s important to be aware of any changes occurring inside your mouth.

“Quite often it is easier to notice lumps and bumps on the outside of the body or to dismiss a mouth ulcer as benign. Most of us will spend at least a few minutes every day in front of a mirror brushing our teeth so while we’re there it makes sense to have a quick look inside the mouth.

Check

“If you keep a lookout for these symptoms then a simple 45 second check really could save your life.

“If you notice anything out of the ordinary, please speak to your dentist or a doctor.”

With around 7,000 Brits diagnosed with mouth cancer last year, the disease is one of the UK’s fastest increasing cancers, with cases rising by a third in the last decade alone.

Survival rates of mouth cancer have not improved in the last 20 years and the oral health charity is concerned that too many are mouth cancers are being diagnosed at a late stage, significantly reducing our chance to beat the disease.

CEO of the Oral Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter OBE added: “Mouth cancer can appear anywhere in the mouth including the lips, tongue, cheek, throat and gums.

“Mouth cancer can have a devastating effect on a person’s life, impacting on their breathing, eating and speech. Reconstructive surgery could also change their appearance while the experience often has an impact on confidence and self-esteem.

“By developing a greater understanding about the early warning signs and symptoms, the lifestyle factors which increase our risk, and recognising where to go if we notice anything unusual inside our mouth, we can detect mouth cancer early. This will not only improve our chances of beating it but will also reduce the amount of invasive surgery needed to treat it.

MC2

“During every dental check-up, your dentist will do a visual examination for mouth cancer and look for anything that might be a cause for concern. That’s why it’s so important to keep regular dental check-ups – it’s not just about the health of our teeth and gums – a trip to the dentist could really be a life saver.”

To find out more information about mouth cancer and Mouth Cancer Action Month, please visit www.mouthcancer.org